August 17


WEEK ONE: Day One

Essential Question:

How will we work effectively and productively together in the classroom?

Essential Skill or Concept:


Classroom behavior and learning procedures

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will explain class behavior.

1. All school rules apply for everyone.

2. Everyone must be prompt and in assigned seats ready to learn when the teacher closes the door.

3. Everyone must be prepared - i.e., have all class materials and know due dates.

4. Students will NOT be permitted to go to their lockers or the restrooms during the class period. Take care of issues between classes.

5. Students will NOT be permitted to borrow materials from the teacher or classmates.

6. Students and teacher will be polite, respectful, and positive.

7. Students will raise hands to be called upon and then speak in normal tones of voice.

8. Students and teacher will listen attentively.

9. Students and teacher will be productive. We will use class time wisely, submit work on time, and always do our best.

B. The teacher will review of materials needed for each class.


1. 3-ring binder with multiple dividers (more than one inch side)
2. Loose leaf paper
3. Black pen
4. Small index cards
5. Small index box for the index cards

C. The teacher will model typical class components.

1. The teacher will demonstrate use of the class blog.

2. The teacher will introduce the procedure for daily vocabulary study that culminates each week with a quiz on Wednesday. Students will practice the daily procedure with materials provided by the teacher.

3. The teacher will introduce the procedure for addressing the daily "Essential Question." Students will observe how materials are organized and utilized during class to prepare to work. They will demonstrate their understanding by organizing their materials accordingly.

4. Students will discuss how these classroom procedures will help them be effective learners.

5. Students will arrive in class tomorrow prepared to be effective students.

August 18

WEEK ONE: Day Two

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Question:

How do grammar and syntax affect our understanding of language?

Essential Skill or Concept: Grammar and syntax unit overview

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will explain the terms:

ADVANCED Rhetoric builds an effective and interesting style

The writer’s word and phrase choice (diction) is impressive, and the sentence structure is sophisticated and varied (syntax).

BASIC Rhetoric builds on the foundation of
Grammar
Correct spelling
Mechanics
Usage
Complete thoughts


B. The teacher will ask students "How do we build the basic sentence or complete thought?".

The teacher will gauge students’ understanding of sentence strategy basics by having them demonstrate in writing in their notebooks. Students may volunteer to share on the board.

C. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handout, "Simple Sentences, Part 1."

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

D. Students will receive their handout packet entitled "Basic Steps in the Research Process, " and the teacher will provide tentative due dates. The class will discuss the research activities of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in order to have an understanding of their papers' purposes to persuade, predict, and/or evaluate.

E. For homework, students will study the corrected forms in today's handout and know terms discussed in the class review:

diagramming as a tool to understanding function and relationship

parts of a sentence: subject and verb

complete subject and simple subject

complete predicate and simple predicate

compound subject and compound verb

simple sentence (classification)

declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence (sentence type according to purpose of the writer)

S V (sentence pattern: Subject + verb)

parts of speech:

1. noun, common noun, proper noun

2. pronoun, personal pronouns used as subjects, indefinite pronouns used as subjects, interrogative pronouns used as subjects

August 19

WEEK ONE: Day Three

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Question:

How can knowledge of the different parts of a sentence and different parts of speech improve our writing and speaking?

Essential Skill or Concept:

Use various parts of the sentence and various parts of speech correctly in written and spoken language

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through discussion/quiz:

diagramming as a tool to understanding function and relationship

parts of a sentence: subject and verb

complete subject and simple subject

complete predicate and simple predicate

compound subject and compound verb

simple sentence (classification)

declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence (sentence type according to purpose of the writer)

S V (sentence pattern: Subject + verb)

parts of speech:

1. noun, common noun, proper noun

2. pronoun, personal pronouns used as subjects, indefinite pronouns used as subjects, interrogative pronouns used as subjects

B. The teacher will ask students "What roles do modifiers play in communicating ideas?".

The teacher will gauge students’ understanding of modifiers by having them share examples that they remember.

C. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handouts, "Simple Sentences, Part 2."

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

D. For homework, students will study the corrected forms in today's handout and know terms discussed in the class review:

modifier

adjective

comparative form of an adjective

superlative form of an adjective

questions that adjectives can answer about a noun

possessive forms of pronouns that act as adjectives

SENIORS also: Select a general topic related to your senior project and that interests you. Begin to focus the research topic. How? Use the "encyclopedia method," the "subtopic method," or the "question method" as discussed during the opening of class.

August 20

WEEK ONE: Day Four

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Question:

How can knowledge of the different parts of a sentence and different parts of speech improve our writing and speaking?

Essential Skill or Concept:

Use various parts of the sentence and various parts of speech correctly in written and spoken language

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through discussion/quiz:

diagramming as a tool to understanding function and relationship

parts of a sentence: subject and verb

complete subject and simple subject

complete predicate and simple predicate

compound subject and compound verb

simple sentence (classification)

declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence (sentence type according to purpose of the writer)

S V (sentence pattern: Subject + verb)

parts of speech:

1. noun, common noun, proper noun

2. pronoun, personal pronouns used as subjects, indefinite pronouns used as subjects, interrogative pronouns used as subjects

3. modifier, adjective, comparative form of an adjective, superlative form of an adjective, questions that adjectives can answer about a noun, possessive forms of pronouns that act as adjectives

B. The teacher will ask students "What roles do modifiers play in communicating ideas?".

The teacher will gauge students’ understanding of modifiers by having them share examples that they remember.

C. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handouts, "Simple Sentences, Part 3."

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

D. For homework, students will study the corrected forms in today's handout and know terms discussed in the class review:

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

Seniors also: List key words to investigate your research topic by going to an encyclopedia, or other reference source, to get an overview of the topic. Begin now to make source cards for whatever sources you will use for information.

August 23

WEEK ONE: Day Five

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Question:

How can knowledge of the different parts of a sentence and different parts of speech improve our writing and speaking?

Essential Skill or Concept:

Use various parts of the sentence and various parts of speech correctly in written and spoken language

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through discussion/quiz:

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

diagramming as a tool to understanding function and relationship

parts of a sentence: subject and verb

complete subject and simple subject

complete predicate and simple predicate

compound subject and compound verb

simple sentence (classification)

declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence (sentence type according to purpose of the writer)

S V (sentence pattern: Subject + verb)

parts of speech:

1. noun, common noun, proper noun

2. pronoun, personal pronouns used as subjects, indefinite pronouns used as subjects, interrogative pronouns used as subjects

3. modifier, adjective, comparative form of an adjective, superlative form of an adjective, questions that adjectives can answer about a noun, possessive forms of pronouns that act as adjectives

B. The teacher will have students create their own basic diagrams of their original sentences according to the following criteria:

Given the diagram structures, use any five of this week's vocabulary words.
Add ACTION verbs that are specific and interesting.
Add common nouns, proper nouns, or pronouns as subjects.
Add descriptive, vibrant adjectives to modify nouns.
Add adverbs to modify verbs, adjectives, or adverbs.

C. The teacher will have all students come to the boards in groups to draw specific diagrams and to present in writing and orally their original sentences with assigned diagrams.

D. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handouts, "Simple Sentences, Parts 4 and 6: Direct Objects and Object Complements."

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

E. For homework, students will study the corrected forms in today's class presentations and know terms discussed in the class review:

complement

direct object

object complement

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

Seniors also: Brain storm questions for your pupose by (1) asking factual questions; (2) asking interpretive questions.

August 24

WEEK Two: Day One

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Question:

How can knowledge of the different parts of a sentence and different parts of speech improve our writing and speaking?

Essential Skill or Concept:

Use various parts of the sentence and various parts of speech correctly in written and spoken language

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through discussion/quiz:

complement

direct object

object complement

sentence patterns: S - V; S - V - DO; S - V - DO - OC

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

diagramming as a tool to understanding function and relationship

parts of a sentence: subject and verb

complete subject and simple subject

complete predicate and simple predicate

compound subject and compound verb

simple sentence (classification)

declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence (sentence type according to purpose of the writer)

S V (sentence pattern: Subject + verb)

parts of speech:

1. noun, common noun, proper noun

2. pronoun, personal pronouns used as subjects, indefinite pronouns used as subjects, interrogative pronouns used as subjects

3. modifier, adjective, comparative form of an adjective, superlative form of an adjective, questions that adjectives can answer about a noun, possessive forms of pronouns that act as adjectives

4. coordinating conjunction

B. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handouts, "Simple Sentences, Parts 5: Indirect Objects."

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

C. The students will individually diagram the sheet with sentences containing subject, verb, complement. [The one-ton African rhinoceros is easily tamed.]

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

D. For homework, students will study for the vocabulary quiz on Lesson 1:

spelling

part of speech

definition

use in context of sentence

August 25

WEEK Two: Day Two

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Question:

How can knowledge of the different parts of a sentence and different parts of speech improve our writing and speaking?

Essential Skills or Concepts:

Spell this week's vocabulary words as they are dictated. Give the part of speech for each word, as well as the definition. Use each word in a sentence to reveal comprehension.

Essential Skill or Concept:

Use various parts of the sentence and various parts of speech correctly in written and spoken language

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through discussion/quiz:

complement

direct object

object complement

indirect object

sentence patterns: S - V; S - V - DO; S - V - DO - OC; S - V - IO - DO

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

diagramming as a tool to understanding function and relationship

parts of a sentence: subject and verb

complete subject and simple subject

complete predicate and simple predicate

compound subject and compound verb

simple sentence (classification)

declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence (sentence type according to purpose of the writer)

S V (sentence pattern: Subject + verb)

parts of speech:

1. noun, common noun, proper noun

2. pronoun, personal pronouns used as subjects, indefinite pronouns used as subjects, interrogative pronouns used as subjects

3. modifier, adjective, comparative form of an adjective, superlative form of an adjective, questions that adjectives can answer about a noun, possessive forms of pronouns that act as adjectives

4. coordinating conjunction

B. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handouts, "Simple Sentences, Parts 7: Subject Complements - Predicate Nominative and Predicate Adjectives."

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

E. For homework, students will study the corrected forms in today's class presentations and know terms discussed in the class review:

sentence patterns: S - V; S - V - DO; S - V - DO - OC; S - V - IO - DO; S - LV PN; S - LV - PA

complement

direct object

object complement

indirect object

subject complement

predicate nominative

predicate adjective

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

Seniors also: Brain storm questions for your pupose by (1) asking factual questions; (2) asking interpretive questions.

August 26

WEEK Two: Day Three

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Question:

How can knowledge of the different parts of a sentence and different parts of speech improve our writing and speaking?

Essential Skill or Concept:

Use various parts of the sentence and various parts of speech correctly in written and spoken language

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through discussion/quiz:

sentence patterns: S - V; S - V - DO; S - V - DO - OC; S - V - IO - DO; S - LV - PN; S - LV - PA

complement

direct object

object complement

indirect object

subject complement

predicate nominative

predicate adjective

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

B. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handouts, "Simple Sentences, Parts 7: Subject Complements - Predicate Nominative and Predicate Adjectives."

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

C. The teacher will review the elements of syntax: sentence types, sentence classifications, and sentence patterns. Students will discuss the relationships among parts of speech, parts of a sentence, sentence purpose, punctuation, and sentence patterns in creating mature, varied sentences

D. For homework, students will study the corrected forms in today's class presentations and know terms discussed in the class review:

sentence patterns: S - V; S - V - DO; S - V - DO - OC; S - V - IO - DO; S - LV - PN; S - LV - PA
complement
direct object
object complement
indirect object
subject complement
predicate nominative
predicate adjective
modifier
adverb
adverbs modifying verbs
adverbs modifying adjectives
adverbs modifying adverbs
comparative forms of adverbs
superlative forms of adverbs

Prepare for senior project and senior paper proposals on Monday.

August 27

WEEK Two: Day Four

Unit Theme:

Transition from grammar and mechanics to syntax to paragraphs

Unit Essential Question:

What roles do grammar and mechanics play in crafting a solid piece of writing?

Essential Skills or Concepts:

Using specific parts of speech to write more clearly, powerfully, and creatively (common nouns, proper nouns, action verbs, adjectives, adverbs)

Deciding one's purpose for writing: narration, exposition, description, persuasion

Identifying sentence type, purpose, and pattern to create variety and interest

Using sensory detail

Pre-writing with story details, descriptions, conflict, characters, setting in mind

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review the homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through the following:

  • The student will choose a familiar fairytale from the list given.
  • The student will list five common nouns that fit the story.
  • The student will list at least three proper nouns that fit the story.
  • The student will list at least twelve vivid action verbs to fit the story.
  • The student will list ten sensory and vivid adjectives to fit the story.
  • The student will list six vibrant adverbs that fit the story.
  • The student will write and label the following sentence patterns to fit the story: subject-verb; subject-verb-direct object; subject-verb-direct object-object complement; subject-verb-indirect object-direct object.
  • The student will write a descriptive sentence or sentence in dialogue for each of the following: declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, and exclamatory sentence.

B. For students that complete this exercise correctly, they may proceed with the following:

  • Decide the means of discourse: exposition, narration, persuasion, description.
  • Develop plot, conflict, and resolution for creative versions of the fairytales.
  • Experiment with 1st and 3rd person, and then decide the best one for the story.
  • Establish setting and characters.
  • Use sensory detail.
  • Use effective time/order transitions.
  • Write with a variety of tones, moods, voices.
  • Parameters:
  1. Do not skip any steps of the pre-writing process.
  2. Be original. Add a twist. Create interest.
  3. Use dialogue if the student likes. Check pages 755 and 756 in the grammar text.
  4. Use only characters that suit the setting and action.
  5. Do not use names or situations that are derogatory or demeaning to others.
  6. Employ formal or informal style.

C. For homework complete any step in Part A that was not done in class.

August 30

WEEK TWO: Day Five

Unit Theme:

Transition from grammar and mechanics to syntax to paragraphs

Unit Essential Question:

How can you correct any errors so that they do not distract the reader from your ideas?

Essential Skills or Concepts:

Editing the written assignment for clarity of subject, purpose, and effect

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review the homework study with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through the following:

  • Decide the means of discourse: exposition, narration, persuasion, description.
  • Develop plot, conflict, and resolution for creative versions of the fairytales.
  • Experiment with 1st and 3rd person, and then decide the best one for the story.
  • Establish setting and characters.
  • Use sensory detail.
  • Use effective time/order transitions.
  • Write with a variety of tones, moods, voices.
  • Parameters:
  1. Do not skip any steps of the pre-writing process.
  2. Be original. Add a twist. Create interest.
  3. Use dialogue if the student likes. Check pages 755 and 756 in the grammar text.
  4. Use only characters that suit the setting and action.
  5. Do not use names or situations that are derogatory or demeaning to others.
  6. Employ formal or informal style.

B. The teacher will work with the class as a whole and as individuals in proofreading and editing the first draft.

Students will complete "Closer Look at My Writing" and the worksheet on the following: voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions.

C. For homework, students will prepare the formal draft according to the teacher's directions.

August 31

WEEK THREE: Day One

Literary Unit Theme:

Stages of Life

Essential Question:

What does it mean to "grow up"?

Unit Skills and Concepts:

Students will site lessons/concepts they learn about humankind and themselves by studying the lives of others in literature.

Students will identify thematic elements of the "stages of life" in short stories, drama, and poetry.

Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze significant details of plot development.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the climax in plot structure.

Students will analyze characters in fiction and drama - their words, actions, motivations, strengths, and weaknesses.

Students will identify and explain how tone, figurative language, and sensory devices in poetry effect a thematic look at a stage in life.

Today's Skills or Concepts:

After a presentation and discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stages," the student will be able to reference a stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome while reading Act II, Scene 7, Lines 146-173, of Shakespeare's As You Like It.

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will share an article on the developmental stages of Erik Erikson by Arlene F. Harder, MA, MFT.

B. Class will discuss the developmental stages, the ego development outcome of each, the basic strength of each, the crisis at each stage, as well as positive and negative outcomes at each developmental step.

C. Teacher and students will read together Act II, Scene 7, Lines 146-173, of Shakespeare's As You Like It, and then discuss the stages the man goes through during his life.

D. Students will compare Shakespeare's stages with Erikson's stages.

E. For homework, students will prepare for this week's vocabulary quiz and work on the final drafts of their fairytales.

September 1

WEEK THREE: Day Two

Literary Unit Theme:

Stages of Life

Essential Question:

What does it mean to "grow up"?

Unit Skills and Concepts:

Students will site lessons/concepts they learn about humankind and themselves by studying the lives of others in literature.

Students will identify thematic elements of the "stages of life" in short stories, drama, and poetry.

Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze significant details of plot development.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the climax in plot structure.

Students will analyze characters in fiction and drama - their words, actions, motivations, strengths, and weaknesses.

Students will identify and explain how tone, figurative language, and sensory devices in poetry effect a thematic look at a stage in life.

Today's Skills or Concepts:

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stages," the student will be able to reference a stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome while reading Katherine Mansfield's "Miss Brill."

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will administer the vocabulary quiz and give directions for the reading and writing assignment.

B. After a review of yesterday's discussion of Erik Eriksons' "Developmental Stages," students will read Katherine Mansfield's "Miss Brill," pages 79 - 82 in the text. As they read, students will complete the "Stages of Life - Old Age" reading log by utilizing the Erikson Stage of Old Age.

C. In their notebooks, all students will answer questions #2 - 7 on page 83.

E. For homework, students will prepare the final drafts of their fairytales.

September 2 and 3

WEEK THREE: Days Three and Four

Literary Unit Theme:

Stages of Life

Essential Question:

What turning points determine our individual paths to adulthood?

Unit Skills and Concepts:

Students will site lessons/concepts they learn about humankind and themselves by studying the lives of others in literature.

Students will identify thematic elements of the "stages of life" in short stories, drama, and poetry.

Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze significant details of plot development.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the climax in plot structure.

Students will analyze characters in fiction and drama - their words, actions, motivations, strengths, and weaknesses.

Students will identify and explain how tone, figurative language, and sensory devices in poetry effect a thematic look at a stage in life.

Today's Skills or Concepts:

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stage - Old Age," the student will be able to discuss the stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome in Katherine Mansfield's "Miss Brill."

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stage - Youth," the student will be able to record the stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome in Frank O'Connor's "The Drunkard."

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will guide a class discussion of "Miss Brill," based on students' responses concerning their reading logs and written answers to critical thinking questions.

B. Students will read Frank O'Connor's "The Drunkard," pages 251 - 258 in the text. As they read, students will complete the "Stages of Life - Youth" reading log by utilizing the Erikson Stage of Youth.

C. In their notebooks, all students will answer questions #1 - 7 on page 259.

E. For homework, students will complete any questions that remain unfinished in the previous exercise.

September 7

No Lesson on Labor Day

WEEK THREE: Day Five

Literary Unit Theme:

Stages of Life

Essential Question:

What turning points determine our individual paths to adulthood?

Unit Skills and Concepts:

Students will site lessons/concepts they learn about humankind and themselves by studying the lives of others in literature.

Students will identify thematic elements of the "stages of life" in short stories, drama, and poetry.

Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze significant details of plot development.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the climax in plot structure.

Students will analyze characters in fiction and drama - their words, actions, motivations, strengths, and weaknesses.

Students will identify and explain how tone, figurative language, and sensory devices in poetry effect a thematic look at a stage in life.

Today's Skills or Concepts:

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stage - Youth," the student will be able to discuss the stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome in Frank O'Connor's "The Drunkard."

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stage - Old Age," the student will be able to record the stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome in Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall."

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will guide a class discussion of "The Drunkard," based on students' responses concerning their reading logs and written answers to critical thinking questions.

B. Students will read Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," pages 442 - 449 in the text. As they read, students will complete the "Stages of Life - Old Age" reading log by utilizing the Erikson Stage of Old Age.

C. In their notebooks, all students will answer the following questions:

  • What connotations does the name "Weatherall" have in the context of the story?
  • How is it a suitable name for the main character, Granny?
  • Cite examples to show that life has not been "too much for her."
  • Identify the following characters and tell whether they are related primarily to Granny's present or to her "past": Cornelia, John, Doctor, Harry, George, Father Connolly.
  • What roles do these characters play in Granny's life and her thoughts?
  • What is the significance of Granny's seeing Hapsy again?
  • Where is Hapsy?
  • "She had spent so much time preparing for death there was no need for bringing it up again." Explain how, in light of the end of the story, this sentence is not true.
  • Why is the jilting so important to Granny?
  • How is the jilting related to the last paragraph of the story?
  • In the story figurative language is often used to convey Granny's state of mind. For example, to Granny "Doctor Harry floated like a balloon around the foot of the bed." Find three other examples of figurative language used to convey a state of mind.

E. For homework, students will complete any questions that remain unfinished in the previous exercise.

September 8

WEEK FOUR: Day One

Literary Unit Theme:

Stages of Life

Essential Question:

What turning points determine our individual paths to adulthood?

Unit Skills and Concepts:

Students will site lessons/concepts they learn about humankind and themselves by studying the lives of others in literature.

Students will identify thematic elements of the "stages of life" in short stories, drama, and poetry.

Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze significant details of plot development.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the climax in plot structure.

Students will analyze characters in fiction and drama - their words, actions, motivations, strengths, and weaknesses.

Students will identify and explain how tone, figurative language, and sensory devices in poetry effect a thematic look at a stage in life.

Today's Skills or Concepts:

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stage - Old Age," the student will be able to record the stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome in Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall."

Students will be able to record and discuss developmental stage(s) - crisis, positive possible outcomes, or negative possible outcomes - in Alice Walker's "Everyday Use."

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will guide a class discussion of "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," based on students' responses concerning their reading logs and written answers to critical thinking questions.

B. Students will read Alice Walker's "Everyday Use," pages 449 - 456 in the text. As they read, students will complete the "Stages of Life" reading log(s) appropriate to the story.

C. In their notebooks, all students will answer the following questions:

Discussion Questions for Alice Walker‘s "Everyday Use" (1973)

  1. Identify how the narrator describes her garden and what this description would signify.
  2. What is the importance of the TV show in the story?
  3. How does it help us understand Mama and Dee?
  4. Comment on Mama’s dream. What could it tell us about the characters and the themes of the story?
  5. Identify the physical descriptions of the three women in the story.
  6. Make a list of their personality traits.
  7. Then discuss what each of these women could symbolize in the story.
  8. Comment on the three women’s responses to the fire.
  9. What is the importance of the quilt in the story?
  10. What does it represent?
  11. What does it mean to Dee, Mama and Maggie?
  12. Do these three women differ from one another in relation to their perceptions of the quilt? If yes, in what way(s).
  13. What is the importance of names in the story? For example, what does “Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo” signify in the story?
  14. Discuss the significance of the “churn” in relation to the three women in the story.
  15. What could Dee’s taking a Polaroid photograph signify?
  16. Why do you think Dee prefers to exclude herself from the photograph?
  17. Why does Maggie have a real smile at the end of the story?
  18. Comment on the mother’s choice at the end.
  19. Why is the story titled “Everyday Use”?
  20. Why does the mother compare her daughters to different animals?
  21. What does this reveal about her attitudes toward Dee and Maggie?

September 9

WEEK FOUR: Day Two

Literary Unit Theme:

Stages of Life

Essential Question:

What turning points determine our individual paths to adulthood?

Unit Skills and Concepts:

Students will site lessons/concepts they learn about humankind and themselves by studying the lives of others in literature.

Students will identify thematic elements of the "stages of life" in short stories, drama, and poetry.

Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze significant details of plot development.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the climax in plot structure.

Students will analyze characters in fiction and drama - their words, actions, motivations, strengths, and weaknesses.

Students will identify and explain how tone, figurative language, and sensory devices in poetry effect a thematic look at a stage in life.

Today's Skills or Concepts:

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stage - Old Age," the student will be able to record the stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome in in Alice Walker's "Everyday Use."

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will guide a class discussion of Alice Walker's "Everyday Use," pages 449 - 456 in the text. As they read, students will complete the "Stages of Life" reading log(s) appropriate to the story:

  1. Identify how the narrator describes her garden and what this description would signify.
  2. What is the importance of the TV show in the story?
  3. How does it help us understand Mama and Dee?
  4. Comment on Mama’s dream. What could it tell us about the characters and the themes of the story?
  5. Identify the physical descriptions of the three women in the story.
  6. Make a list of their personality traits.
  7. Then discuss what each of these women could symbolize in the story.
  8. Comment on the three women’s responses to the fire.
  9. What is the importance of the quilt in the story?
  10. What does it represent?
  11. What does it mean to Dee, Mama and Maggie?
  12. Do these three women differ from one another in relation to their perceptions of the quilt? If yes, in what way(s).
  13. What is the importance of names in the story? For example, what does “Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo” signify in the story?
  14. Discuss the significance of the “churn” in relation to the three women in the story.
  15. What could Dee’s taking a Polaroid photograph signify?
  16. Why do you think Dee prefers to exclude herself from the photograph?
  17. Why does Maggie have a real smile at the end of the story?
  18. Comment on the mother’s choice at the end.
  19. Why is the story titled “Everyday Use”?
  20. Why does the mother compare her daughters to different animals?
  21. What does this reveal about her attitudes toward Dee and Maggie?
Research Unit Theme:

Analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of reliable sources, the student will prepare a research paper that is focused, organized, and polished.

Unit Skill:

True research requires the researcher to analyze and synthesize information from a variety of reliable sources.

Unit Essential Question:

How can a topic of interest be developed into a research paper that reflects analysis and synthesis of information from a variety of reliable sources?















Bloom's Taxonomy revised by Richard C. Overbaugh and Lynn Schultz, Old Dominion University

Essential Skill or Concept #1:

The student will assimlate and build on the researched work of others to arrive at his/her own understanding of the subject.

Homework:

Students will read Section 1.1, "The Research Paper as a Form of Exploration," pages 3 - 5, about the purposes for completing research as outlined in the text: "As you use and scrupulously acknowledge sources, however, always remember that the main purpose of doing research is not to summarize the work of others but to assimilate and to build on it and to arrive at your own understanding of the subject."

Also students will also read and be able to discuss in class tomorrow Section 1.2, "The Research Paper as a Form of Communication," page 5.

September 10

WEEK FOUR: Day Three

Research Unit Theme:

Analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of reliable sources, the student will prepare a research paper that is focused, organized, and polished.

Unit Skill:

True research requires the researcher to analyze and synthesize information from a variety of reliable sources.

Unit Essential Question:

How can a topic of interest be developed into a research paper that reflects analysis and synthesis of information from a variety of reliable sources?















Bloom's Taxonomy revised by Richard C. Overbaugh and Lynn Schultz, Old Dominion University

Mini-Lesson:

A. Having READ 1.1 and 1.2, "The Research Paper as a Form of Exploration" and The Research Paper as a Form of Communication," pages 3 - 5, students will discuss in class the purposes for completing research as outlined in the text: "As you use and scrupulously acknowledge sources, however, always remember that the main purpose of doing research is not to summarize the work of others but to assimilate and to build on it and to arrive at your own understanding of the subject."

B. Each student will share the process that he or she employed in Senior Project Class to select a general topic related to his/her senior project and that interests him/her. As a review, the teacher and students will read and discuss 1.3, "Selecting a Topic, pages 6 - 7.

C. Each student will tell how he or she began to focus the research topic using the "encyclopedia method," the "subtopic method," or the "question method."

D. Each student will share the key words used to investigate his/her research topic by going to an encyclopedia, or other reference source, to get an overview of the topic.

E. HOMEWORK: Students will begin now to make source cards for whatever sources he/she will use for information. Each student will begin now to compile a working bibliography. Read about this skill in 1.5, "Compiling a Working Bibliography," pages 31 - 33.

September 13

WEEK THREE: Day Four

Unit Theme:

Analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of reliable sources, the student will prepare a research paper that is focused, organized, and polished.

Unit Skill:

True research requires the researcher to analyze and synthesize information from a variety of reliable sources.

Unit Essential Question:

What is the process for an effective research plan?

Mini-Lesson:

A. Students, having begun to make source cards for whatever sources he/she will use for information, and having read "Compiling a Working Bibliography," Section 1.5, pages 31 - 33, will begin now to compile a working bibliography.

B. Students will LOOK OVER 1.4, "Conducting Research, " pages 8 - 31. As they scan and read particular sections, students will compile a list of questions to ask Mrs. Price, the school librarian.

(She, in turn, can point you to local sources in the community. Here are possible questions for her: What possible resources are available locally? What constitutes a reliable source? How does the evaluation of resources impact the outcomes of the search question? What information is relevant? Where can information be found? What technology is available to me and how can I use it? In addition to her expertise, find answers to these questions, by READING 1.6, "Evaluating Sources," pages 33 - 38.)

C. HOMEWORK: Students should spend at least four hours in research (i.e., reading or exploring the library) during the next two days.

September 14, 15, 16, 17, 20

WEEK FOUR: Day Five and WEEK FIVE: Days One, Two, Three, Four

Unit Theme:

Analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of reliable sources, the student will prepare a research paper that is focused, organized, and polished.

Unit Skill:

True research requires the researcher to analyze and synthesize information from a variety of reliable sources.

Unit Essential Questions:

How can I develop my topic statement to reflect my purpose?

How does a thesis drive a research paper?

Mini-Lesson:

A. Students, having begun to make source cards for whatever sources he/she will use for information, and having read "Compiling a Working Bibliography," Section 1.5, pages 31 - 33, will begin now to compile a working bibliography.

B. The teacher will present three PowerPoint presentations ("From Topic to Thesis," "The Tentative Thesis," and "Refining the Thesis Statement") and then work with students individually to focus topics and write thesis statements. Text references are pages 42 - 43.

C. The teacher will present a PowerPoint presentation ("Source Cards and Note Cards") and then work with students individually to prepare one source card and one notecard. Text references are pages 31 - 33 and pages 38 - 40.

D. HOMEWORK: Students should spend at least four hours in research (i.e., reading or exploring the library) during the next three days.

September 21 to 24, 27 to 28

WEEK FIVE: Day Five and WEEK SIX: Days One, Two, Three

WEEK SIX: Days Four and Five (away at Senior Retreat)

Literary Unit Theme:


Stages of Life

Essential Question:

What turning points determine our individual paths to adulthood?

Unit Skills and Concepts:

Students will site lessons/concepts they learn about humankind and themselves by studying the lives of others in literature.

Students will identify thematic elements of the "stages of life" in short stories, drama, and poetry.

Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze significant details of plot development.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the climax in plot structure.

Students will analyze characters in fiction and drama - their words, actions, motivations, strengths, and weaknesses.

Students will identify and explain how tone, figurative language, and sensory devices in poetry effect a thematic look at a stage in life.

Today's Skills or Concepts:

After a review of the discussion of Erik Erikson's "Developmental Stage - Youth, Adolescence, Adulthood, and Old Age," the student will be able to record the stage's crisis, positive possible outcome, or negative possible outcome in Eudora Welty's "A Worn Path."

Students will be able to record and discuss developmental stage(s) - crisis, positive possible outcomes, or negative possible outcomes - in Truman Capote's "A Christmas Memory."

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. Students will read Eudora Welty's "A Worn Path," pages 456 - 462 in the text. As they read, students will complete the "Stages of Life" reading log(s) appropriate to the story.

B. For their reading file, students will answer the following questions:

1. Where and when does the story take place?

2. What does Phoenix consider “the trial” in her journey?

3. What does she mistake for a man?

4. What is Phoenix’s purpose in going to the city?

5. Why doesn’t she answer the nurse’s questions?

C. Students will read Eudora Welty's "The Point of the Story" and discuss the assigned questions.

D. Students will read Truman Capote's "A Christmas Memory," pages 259 - 268 in the text. As they read, students will complete the "Stages of Life" reading log (s) appropriate to the story. Students will answer questions 1 - 5, listed on page 268 in the text.

E. Homework: Students will spend four to five hours in research during this time period of several days.


September 29 to 30; October 1

WEEK SEVEN: Days One, Two, Three

Unit Theme:

Analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of reliable sources, the student will prepare a research paper that is focused, organized, and polished.

Unit Skill:

True research requires the researcher to analyze and synthesize information from a variety of reliable sources.

Unit Essential Questions:

How can I organize my notes to reflect my purpose?

How does a thesis continue to drive a research paper?

Mini-Lesson:

A. The teacher will present a PowerPoint presentations ("The Outline") and then work with students individually to write an outline that fulfills the thesis. Text references are pages 41 - 42.

B. The teacher will explain the required research project portfolio to document the evolution of the research paper: tentative thesis, approved thesis statement, the working outline, the final outline, source cards, note cards, an early draft, a revised draft, and the final draft.

C. Students will revise the tentative thesis and submit the revised thesis to the teacher. Text references are pages 42 - 43.

D. Students will transform working outlines into final ones.

E. HOMEWORK: Students should spend at least four hours in research (i.e., reading or exploring the library) during the next three days.

October 4 through 8

Dear Students,

I am away this week on a photography adventure in Arizona. What follows are the assignments that you will complete until I return. Enjoy the selections and be productive.



WEEK SEVEN: Days Four and Five

WEEK EIGHT: Days One, Two, Three



PART ONE: The Art of Reading

Daily watch the DVD series The Art of Reading for the first 25 minutes of class.

As students watch each segment, they will complete the specific fill-in-the-blank packet for the specific day:

1. Monday: “Reading for Plot – Five Simple Words” (Lecture 8)

2. Tuesday: “Master Plots – The Stranger and the Journey” (Lecture 9)

3. Wednesday: “The Game is Afoot – Sherlock Holmes” (Lecture 10)

4. Thursday: “The Plot Thickens – Scott and Bronte” (Lecture 11)

5. Friday: “The Plot Vanishes – Faulkner and Woolf” (Lecture 12)

Students will turn in all these completed sheets on Friday at the end of class.


PART TWO: Note card assignment

Student should be bringing resources and note cards to class to continue work on their research papers.

They will need at least 40 note cards by October 11.

If any are not working on his or her note cards, that student must complete the paragraph assignment for the appropriate DVD segment above. The substitute has the assignments for each day.

October 11 through 20

WEEK EIGHT: Days Four and Five

WEEK NINE: Days One through Five

Second Nine Weeks Begins

WEEK TEN: Days One and Two

Unit Theme:

Analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of reliable sources, the student will prepare a research paper that is focused, organized, and polished.

Unit Skill:

True research requires the researcher to analyze and synthesize information from a variety of reliable sources.

Unit Essential Questions:

How can I develop my topic statement to reflect my purpose?

How can I determine if I have enough information?

Mini-Lesson:

A. The teacher and class will review the steps in the research process so far completed:

  • Clarify what to do: choose a topic and a backup topic; do exploratory reading about topic; write a research proposal and a working thesis
  • Gather data/material: create a working bibliography or list of sources; gather all the resources available; determine if there is enough information available to write on the topic (or if there is too much information to meet the length requirements)
  • Locate, Examine, Read, Record Sources: locate sources; read quickly to find the best sources; read and take notes; optional - conduct original research (e.g., interviews)

B. The teacher will present a PowerPoint presentation on ORGANIZING FOR WRITING. Main points include the following:

  • Reevaluate notes and select those most relevant
  • Turn the working thesis into a carefully worded thesis statement
  • Turn the thesis into a working outline that grows out of the thesis statement
  • Gather more information on any sections that are to weak
  • Turn the working outline into a formal outline
  • Write the research paper in thirty minutes (a miniature version)

D. HOMEWORK: Students should continue to spend at least four hours in research (i.e., reading or exploring the library), as well as writing, during the next three days.

October 25 through 29

WEEK Ten: Days Four and Five

WEEK Eleven: Days One, Two, Three

Unit Skill:

Analyzing and synthesizing information from reading specific short story selections, the student will prepare a critical essay that is (1) based on a given prompt/question and (2) is focused, organized, and polished.

Unit Essential Questions:

How can I develop personal interpretations in a persuasive analysis?

How can I develop my thesis to reflect my purpose?

How can I determine if I have enough information?

How do writing to learn strategies help me develop strong interpretations of texts?

What do I need to know to write a well-crafted persuasive analysis?

Mini-Lessons:

A. The teacher and class will review the steps in the critical analysis:

  1. Read the prompt question carefully.
  2. Underline key words in the prompt or question.
  3. Break the question/prompt into components.
  4. Restate the prompt/question in your own words.
  5. Your essay begins with a title indicating your subject: do not underline your title; however, do underline or include in quotation marks those words that are a part of a published title you may be addressing.
  6. The first paragraph presents your thesis (argument) and reveals the direction your essay will take. This paragraph contains more than forty words in three or more sentences.
  7. The first paragraph includes the following:
    The title(s) and the author to be discussed
    The main idea of the prompt/question
    A thesis statement which will be developed into your essay
    TOPIC + ASSERTION + MEANS OF STRUCTURE = THESIS
  8. The body of the essay contains the bulk of your interpretation.
    Each paragraph develops an aspect of your main thesis and works out the details of the argument. (on the average, eleven sentences of 125 or more words)
  9. List main points relating to the thesis statement.
    Each paragraph goes through these steps:
    State each point in a topic sentence.
    Explain in your own words what it means.
    Give an example of the point from the text.
    Give at least one quote from the text.
    Explain the relevance of the implication of the example and/or quote.
    Summarize your point.
  10. Each paragraph contains a topic sentence relating to your thesis.
    Each topic sentence is explained, illustrated, discussed, and related to the thesis. Ideas are clearly developed and lead to a logical conclusion.
  11. Quotations from the text establish your view and give you a chance for interpretive commentary.
  12. Sources, either quoted or alluded to, may back up your position and allow you opportunity for interpretation and further commentary.
  13. Transitions are clearly signaled.

    To show additional ideas: again, moreover, and, not, and the, too, besides, equally important, first, second (etc.), finally, lastly, further, furthermore

    To show time: at length, later, immediately, thereafter, previously, soon, formerly, next, first, second (etc.), afterwards, next

    Cues that make the reader stop and compare: but, notwithstanding, although, yet, on the other hand, and yet, on the contrary, however, after all, conversely, still, simultaneously, nevertheless, in contrast, meanwhile, nonetheless, at the same time, in the meantime

    To summarize: in brief, on the whole, to conclude, in conclusion

    To give examples: for instance, for example, to demonstrate, to illustrate, as an illustration

    To emphasize: obviously, in fact, as a matter of fact, indeed, in any case

    To introduce conclusions: hence, therefore, accordingly, consequently, thus, as a result

14. Your last paragraph is your conclusion and shows insight. Draw your argument to a close and sum up or restate your position without repeating. On the average, this paragraph is three or more sentences of forty or more words.

15. Edit: List the first four words per sentence. Look for repetitious sentence beginnings such as The and Then. Rewrite these sentences for improvement.

16. Edit: Look for potential fragments.

17. Edit: Are there any capitalization errors.

18. Edit: Improve the sentence flow with a variety of sentence forms and structures.

19. Edit: Avoid "dead" words - nice, It is, stuff, There is, Thing, This is, a lot, They are, awesome, There are.

20. Edit: Avoid contractions.

21. Edit: Be concise, not wordy. Avoid redundancy.

22. Edit: Use only third person point of view.

23. Edit: Use appropriate vocabulary words.

24. Edit: Avoid idioms.

25. Edit: Use appropriate figurative language.

26. Edit: Beware the overuse of the same weak verbs – e.g., is, are, was, were, got.

27. Edit: Avoid tense inconsistency. If appropriate, stay in the present tense.

28. Edit: Use active voice.

29. Edit: Use variety in sentence lengths. Use short sentences for emphasis.

30. Edit: Avoid short, choppy sentences that need to be combined or rearranged.

31. Edit: Avoid extremely long sentences which may increase the potential for run-ons.

32. Edit: How do your sentences begin? If more than half of your sentences begin with the subject, rewrite them in a way that varies the beginning.

33. Edit: Find all which clauses and rewrite them to eliminate which. Eliminate as many of, in, to, and by’s as you can.

34. Edit: What forms are your sentences? Count simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences. Rewrite for variety.

35. Edit: Do you have an inverted sentences? Try rewriting a sentence to do so.

36. Edit: Is your diction appropriate to your audience? Check for slang, trite expressions, garbage/empty words. Eliminate as necessary.

37. Edit: Avoid idioms!

38. Edit: Find all instances of it with no antecedent and eliminate.

39. Edit: Find all instances of this or that used without a noun. Add a noun or rewrite.

40. Check your comma use by applying four rules: Use a comma before and, but, for, or, not, so, yet, and still when those words join independent clauses. Use a comma between all terms in a series. Use commas to set off parenthetical openers and afterthoughts. Use a comma after introductory clauses or phrases.

41. Have you used any semicolons? If not, find a sentence or a pair of sentences that would be better punctuated with a semicolon and rewrite.

42. Have you used any dashes? If not, find a sentence or a pair of sentences that would be better punctuated with a dash and rewrite.

43. Have you used apostrophes or colons? Do you need them?

44. Have you used quotation marks? Check for correctness.

45. Presentation: Be sure that the paper uses correct MLA format.

B. Each student will continue to edit his/her paper.


November 1 through 5

Second Nine-Weeks

WEEK ELEVEN: Days Four and Five

WEEK TWELVE: Days One, Two, and Three

Unit Theme:

Grammar and syntax comprehension enhances one's reading and writing ability.

Unit Essential Questions:

How can knowledge of the different parts of a sentence and different parts of speech improve our writing and speaking?

How can phrases give variety to sentence?

Essential Skills or Concepts:

Use various parts of the sentence - including phrases - and various parts of speech correctly in written and spoken language

Mini-Lesson Outline:

A. The teacher will review with students and have them demonstrate individual understanding through discussion/quiz:

subject

predicate

verb

complement

direct object

object complement

indirect object

sentence patterns: S - V; S - V - DO; S - V - DO - OC; S - V - IO - DO

modifier

adverb

adverbs modifying verbs

adverbs modifying adjectives

adverbs modifying adverbs

comparative forms of adverbs

superlative forms of adverbs

diagramming as a tool to understanding function and relationship

parts of a sentence: subject and verb

complete subject and simple subject

complete predicate and simple predicate

compound subject and compound verb

simple sentence (classification)

declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence (sentence type according to purpose of the writer)

coordinating conjunction

preposition

prepositional phrase

appositive

appositive phrase

B. The teacher will have students practice exercises in their "Grammar Training Camp" handouts, "Phrases": prepositional phrases, appositive phrases, verbal phrases - infinitive, gerund, participial.

The teacher will work with students individually according to skill levels.

E. For homework, students will study the corrected forms in today's class presentations and know terms discussed in the class reviews.

F. Students will analyze given sentences by for use of diction and syntax to create a personal style.

G. The teacher will return all senior research paper drafts by Monday.